The SAR Magazine

Winter 2018

The SAR MAGAZINE is the official quarterly publication of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution published quarterly.

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12 SAR MAGAZINE the memorial, which the Rhode Island Society had erected in his honor. The memorial consists of a natural symmetrical granite boulder, weighing approximately 8 tons. Embedded in its face is a tablet of imperishable bronze inscribed as follows: "In honor of 1740 Colonel Israel Angell 1832 who, with his wife Martha A., lies buried here. Major of Col. Daniel Hitchcock's Regiment 1775. Lieut. Colonel of 2nd R.I. Continental Infantry 1777. Colonel of 2nd R.I. Continental Infantry 1777-1781. Friend of Washington, Lafayette and Rochambeau." This memorial was erected by the Rhode Island Society of the Sons of the American Revolution May 4, 1918. The exercises began with the singing of the "Star Spangled Banner" by the entire company of about 100, a cornetist furnishing the accompaniment. The chaplain of the society, Rev. Charles F. Roper, next read from the scriptures and offered prayer. Vice-President Arthur P. Summer spoke in the absence of the president, paying a high tribute to the character of Col. Angell and comparing the principles for which he and his associates fought with those for which the Allied nations were then fighting. He was followed by Compatriot Robert P. Brown, who read an interesting and appreciative paper on Col. Angell, giving the important incidents in his career both as a soldier and citizen, many of which were obtained from his diary and other personal records. The memorial was unveiled by Compatriot Arnold C. Brown, while his young sons, Lloyd and Edward Angell Brown, stood on either side of the boulder, bearing the national and state flags. The exercises concluded with the singing of "America" and the sounding of Taps by a bugler. 14 SAR MAGAZINE Left, Angell's original tombstone; above, the bronze tablet designed for the memorial in 1918.

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